Overview

In 2015, 1 in 10 U.S. adults first began using mobile banking, accounting for growth of 25 million new mobile bankers. At the same time, 28 million more consumers adopted smartphones and 29 million more adopted tablets — some of the highest year-over-year growth ever experienced. This report forecasts consumer adoption of mobile banking, smartphones, tablets, and operating systems on both channels to 2020. Also included in the report are actionable recommendations for overcoming inhibitors of mobile banking adoption such as security concerns, and advice for maximizing engagement from and satisfaction for users already on the channel. Furthermore, this report includes an update on growing threats to the channel, including the evolving mobile banking Trojans. This report is both a look at how far mobile banking has come and how far it can go.

Key questions this report will address:

  • What is the past, present, and projected consumer use of mobile banking?
  • How are consumers accessing mobile banking — by app, browser, or text?
  • What is the current and projected consumer adoption of smartphones and tablets?
  • What is the current market share of smartphone operating systems, including Android and iOS?
  • What is the breakdown of tablet operating systems in the current market share?
  • What are consumer attitudes toward mobile banking services available today?
  • What are the most important mobile banking access points for providers to support today?

Companies Mentioned

Alphabet (Google), Amazon, Apple, Bank of America, Bank of the West, BB&T, BlackBerry, Capital One, Chase, Citibank, Fifth Third Bank, Key Bank, Microsoft, Mitek, NFCU, PayPal, PNC Bank, Regions, Samsung, Santander Bank, SunTrust Bank, TD Bank, U.S. Bank, USAA, Wells Fargo

Methodology

This report is based mainly on data collected online from June to July 2015 and compared with data collected in June to July 2014, June 2013, July 2012, and July 2011. Data was gathered and weighted to reflect a representative sample of the overall U.S. population from the following groups:

  • A random‐sample panel of 3,195 respondents collected online from June to July 2015 . The margin of sampling error is ±1.73 percentage points at the 95% confidence level. The margin of error is higher for questions answered by subsets.
  • A random‐sample panel of 3,225 respondents collected online from July to July 2014 . The margin of sampling error is ±1.73 percentage points at the 95% confidence level. The margin of error is higher for questions answered by subsets.
  • A random‐sample panel of 3,285 respondents in a July 2013 online survey. The margin of sampling error is ±1.71 percentage points at the 95% confidence level. The margin of error is higher for questions answered by subsets.
  • A random‐sample panel of 3,492 respondents with mobile phones in a June 2012 online survey. The margin of sampling error is ±1.66 percentage points at the 95% confidence level. The margin of error is higher for questions answered by subsets.
  • A random‐sample panel of 3,180 respondents with mobile phones in a June 2011 online survey. The margin of sampling error is ±1.74 percentage points at the 95% confidence level. The margin of error is higher for questions answered by subsets.